Tag Archives: limes

Green shreds

KaleDSC_6142.2

Winter time brings sturdy greens, when fresh salad is harder to get and baby greens are traded for a pretty penny. To get more variety, you can use kale or cabbage as a salad. Curly kale, chards or dinosaur kale is is quite hard to digest when raw, so it either needs to be cooked, or prepared in a way that helps digestion. 
Finely slicing raw kale (called chiffonade) helps with digestion and definitely are a great way to train skills with a large knife. The shreds then are massaged with vinaigrette, which makes them very tasty and soft and which reduces the volume of the shreds. I find this recipe more tasty and than steamed kale, likely even better when it is getting warmer. See recipe

If life hands you quinces…

MembrDSC_5704Happy New Year! An unexpected gift from our visit over the holidays was a bag of fresh quinces that Sven had kept from his trees in Mecklenburg, Germany. Your first thought may be quince jelly, elsewhere you may think of liquor, but if you are Hispanic, there is only ‘membrillo’, loosely translated as ‘quince bread’ and eaten with cheese. Fortunately, with one load of quinces, you can make both, as the membrillo is efficiently made from the fruit after separating the juice! And both tastes great even without cheese. Continue reading

Tribal Running Foods

I just finished reading two books, both of them (‘The Jungle effect’ and ‘Born to run’) mention the food, of the Tarahumara Indians, known as the ‘running people’. For example chia seeds and limes, called ‘Chia fresca’ which promptly became a popular ‘energy’ drink in Wallstreet. See recipe
‘The Jungle Effect’ book by Daphne Miller has several chapters where each chapter focuses on one Western disease and travels to a part in the world where the disease is rare or unknown (Cold Spots). Continue reading

Salsa Roja

Fresh Salsa is short lived. The popular thick Latin American red sauce (salsa roja), sells meanwhile better in the US than ketchup and comes in many different colors and recipes. Unlike Salsa Cruda, which is a cooked version of the hot tomato dip, the fresh Salsa is made from raw ingredients. Use the molcajete (mortar & pestle) or an ordinary blender. Important is, that the garlic and lime juice have to be fresh, they prevent the growth of bacteria and therefore should never be replaced by dried powder mixes. On a hot day, with too many tomatoes at hand, Salsa even makes a light dinner with a side salad. Cut a tortilla sheet into chips and toast them on a frying pan and you will have fresh warm chips. Easy and nice effect. Recipe