Tag Archives: sweet potato

You made truffles from what?

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Valentines’ is chocolate season, with sinful sweets and chocolate gifts for loved ones. All the reason to experiment with your own truffles, before the chocolate craze starts.
As in the earlier mayonnaise post, the emulsifier does not need to be from eggs or cream, the blend does not need to contain loads of dairy or fats.

The filling is instead made from a blend of pecans with sweet potato mash(!), they surprisingly taste very much like traditional hand made truffles which makes me wonder, what companies can blend into chocolates these days… DIY and you can influence ingredients; which sweetener or chocolate you use to make it vegan and/or healthier. See recipe

Malaga-torn-knee

MullagaDSC_5686.1The ‘Last Soup of the Year,’ Miss Sophie’s favorite Mulligatawny soup in ‘Dinner for One’, is known in Germany at least since the annual airing of the British play at New Year’s Night. The Anglicized Tamil-Indian soup’s name, that is spoken with a stiff lip, simply means ‘pepper water’.
There are many ways to make this soup, which always has a curry taste and a yellowy turmeric tint. Following is my vegan interpretation. Despite the Indian leaning, the soup is perfect for our Northern cold season. See recipe.

First Holiday Flavors

SconeDSC_5046It is that Pumpkin time again… Leaves are red and yellow, temperatures just shy of freezing point and hot soups are making a comeback. Warm hugs of sugar and pumpkin spices and a warm kitchen are so comforting…  ah, pumpkin scones. When I saw this gluten free recipe I had to veganize it even though I had only sweet potatoes instead of pumpkins. I did not have all of the alternative flours either, if you have a grain container it helps to make quick brown rice or millet flour for part of the recipe. Flavorful, highly recommended and going fast. See recipe.

Breakfast alternatives

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My posts become sparce when we are busy… and food goes fast when you are sharing with visitors. We like the blueberry bread from our farmer’s market, but the one we usually buy contains eggs and white flour. Looking for alternatives, we found a sweet version of sprouted Manna bread, nice for a change. However I also like this nut and pumpkin bread in my veganized recipe: See recipe. 

Wet punky-pie

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Looks can be so deceiving. Here is my warning: ‘Do not fake your food photography or retouch the soul out of it.’ Today I tried a recipe, that looked like little brownie squares. Although I changed some ingredients, I was not prepared that this was not a regular cake, it did not rise and left the oven merely behaving like a hot pudding. However, after cooling for several hours, it turned into a really nice pumpkin pie, just what I wanted, except I nervously had eaten many pieces along the way checking the ‘status’. Continue reading

Indian Rice

CurryDSC_3171.1Wild Rice is native in North America and China. The long grain has a dark, chewy outer skin with a delicate inner core and a nutty vegetal taste. It is a cousin to white rice, but is higher in protein than other grains and has recently gained popularity as local gluten free speciality in the US.

Continue reading

Something warm and quick

Sometimes I just want a quick and warm filling meal. Looking at recipes, they all seemed to ask for things I had not planned for… soaked beans or chickpeas and I did not plan ahead. So I altered a dish to fit what I have. Lentils can be cooked quickly, sweet potatoes can replace winter squash, quinoa for rice, parsley instead of cilantro. The result was a very filling sweet curry. I could have combined it with steamed kale. See recipe

‘Grain’ of the future

The Incas named Quinoa, the ‘Mother of all grains’, for its high nutritional value; High contents of complete proteins, fiber, magnesium and iron plus a good amount of calcium. The hardy plant that is related to beets, spinach and amaranth, also contains oxalic acid in the stems and leaves. Bitter saponins in the seeds require cooking before consumption.
2013 has been declared International Year of Quinoa by the United Nations. Enough reason to give a closer look to this ‘superfood’. How about Sweet potato and Quinoa patties with hot sauce? See recipe

Beat the Heat

We are in the midst of dog days… Heat around the 90’s and high humidity. I catch myself thinking twice if I should use oven and stove. Not primarily to save energy, but to keep the carefully balanced inside temperature down. In that sense using a pressure cooker for grains and beans is a blessing as it really reduces cooking time.
Today’s CSA pickup had some surprise ingredients such as optional okra. What about an African Stew? At least the heat helps to make it feel very authentic…   See recipe

Gnocchi Time

Last time I made Gnocchi, I was still in college… I remember the sticky mess. To get a more manageable dough, we had added more and more flour, to almost double amount, but the easy to handle dough produced very heavy lumpy gnocchi. Plus the whole kitchen was dusted with flour… Continue reading

The better Crunch

Do you remember Terra Chips? Chips made from blue and white potatoes, yams and beets. Succulent, less oily and tasting sweet and salty. A really great experience. And you can do it all yourself!
I had a big box full of sweet potatoes. If you want to make chips, most internet recipes state that you will bake them in 400˚F or higher. Most of my chips curled up and burned right away in such temperatures already after ten minutes. The better range seems to be around 300, 350 degrees, abt. 20 minutes, including turning them once. The most important part however, is cutting them all the same thickness, which won’t work by hand, you will need to use the food processor or a mandolin.
Then experiment with following recipe…

Crossing the river

This weekend we crossed over to Nyack. True Foods, a campus style restaurant which makes very nice curries. I was inspired to do my own version of a mixed vegetable curry with coconut milk. Very comforting. See recipe

Spicey Roesti (Rösti, Röschti)

Potatoes are an important staple in Northern European cooking. In Switzerland for example, you will find many different local versions of Roesti (Röschti), potato pancakes, eaten with applesauce or ‘Fleischkäse’ (cured meat). Other countries have their own recipes and expressions. Satisfying to eat and easy to make, they found their way to the US. You may have heard of Potato Pancakes, Kartoffelpuffer, or Latkes… Continue reading